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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
of rupert murdoch's top deputies. elizabeth palmer is in london with more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. the police investigation is getting very serious now. one of the main lines of inquiry is going to determine or try and determine whether senior officers of murdoch's company knew of or were involved in unethical or especially illegal activity. mobbed by reporters in london, rupert murdoch plowed through, all smiles, to have dinners with his embattled ceo rebekah brooks. she'll be questioned by police later this week. there is a scramble inside murdoch's media empire to control toxic fallout from the "news of the world" hacking scandal which could start waves in the u.s. >> there are waves of could it have happened here? there are locks of reporters at any given time on the ground in the u.s., many stories, many of its celebrity stories are datelined here. >> reporter: the scandal broke last week with the case of milly dowler, a teenager murdered in 2002. her parents and thousands of others discovered that personal voice messages had been hacked by "news of the world" journal
-hacking scandal is cutting closer to the top of the murdoch media empire. rupert murdoch's top aide has been released from custody after her arrest. one of britain's top cops also resigned. abc's jeffrey kofman reports from london. >> reporter: the scandal that shuttered one of britain's oldest newspapers is nothing less than an earthquake. shaking this country to the core. the casualties just keep mounting. the latest? the head of scotland yard. sir paul stevenson resigned. he insisted he had no involvement in his force's failure to investigate widespread alleged criminal acts by murdoch's journalists. nor the alleged bribery of police officers by reporters. >> i had no knowledge of the extent of this disgraceful practice. or indeed to the extent of it. and the repugnant nature of the selection of victims that is now emerging. >> reporter: and there is more. rebekah brooks, just days ago she was at the apex of power running rupert murdoch's british operations. it is said he considered her his other daughter. on friday, she resigned from the company. she was arrested. the tenth arrest since
the scandal that rattled rupert murdoch's media empire. they reached the british government today, as a former spokesman for prime minister david cameron was arrested. abc's jeffrey kofman now on the tabloid world out of control. >> reporter: when andy coulson was editor of "the news of the world," the paper he ran destroyed people's lives. >> i'm afraid i can'n'say anymore at this stage. >> reporter: arrested this morning, facing charges of perjury, bribing police, hacking people's phones in search of scoops. andy coulson is also uncomfortably the former spokesman of british prime minister david cameron, who, today, scrambled to distance himself. >> but press freedom does not mean the press should be above the law. >> reporter: but "the news of the world" w w, which is why the famous and the powerful in britain have feared and loathed the tabloid for years. case in point? remember when sarah ferguson was caught selling access to prince andrew? >> 500,000 pounds when you can, to me -- open doors. reporter: and this headline. when prince harry angered his girlfrfrnd by visiting a strip club. ho
the massive tabloid scandal that brought one of the biggest newspapers down in just 24 hours. rupert murdoch under huge pressure as the outrage grows. >>> and the extraordinary spirit of survival. jaycee dugard breaks her silence about her 18-year ordeal. how she found hope in the middle of her kidnapping hell. >> you just do what you have to do to survive. >> diane sawyer, here with her emotional and exclusive interview. >>> and princess in prison? she's been a royal only for a week. why does she look like her unhappy highness? inside the misery of princess charlene. >>> and good morning, everyone. happy friday. and what a crazy scene in great britain. >> oh, my goodness. >> oldest newspaper in the country closed. the former editor, just moments ago arrested. this guy was an aide to the british prime minister and had to address this. other arrests coming for people in the media empire of rupert murdoch, the owner of fox news. >> and this is all because there are allegations the newspapepe was hacking into cell phones and e-mail accounts of people. and not just celebrities and famous people
, "the news of the world" folds. but the hacking scandal tainting rupert murdoch's media empire keep exploding. two more murdoch newspapers now accused of trying to tap into the personal information of a former british prime minister. and pakistan's reaction to news that the united states government is cutting millions of dollars in military aid. i'll talk to the country's ambassador to the united states about the growing tension and the impact on the war on terror. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." the federal debt is soaring high or above the limit almost by the second. and president obama is vowing to hold daily negotiations to raise the ceiling if that's what it takes. another round of talks broke up just a little while ago without repeat any break through. with 22 days left the president says he won't accept the stop gap plan to prevent america from defaulting on its debts. he used a news conference this morning to challenge both parties and to lay down some markers. >> i will not sign a 30-day or a 60-day or a 90-day extension. that's just not an acceptable appr
:00 am out west. british tabloid news of the world should down, owner rupert murdoch, the murder victim's family, says has not apologized. >>> urgent talks on how to slash spending head back to the table today. >>> we begin with more stunning allegations against british tabloid "news of the world." "the daily mirror" is reporting that staffers with the now defunct paper tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims. owner rupertmurdoch arrived in london. zain verjee has all the details. >> british tabloid "the mirror" is quoting a former new york city cop that's making these allegations that "news of the world" journalists tried to hack into the mailboxes and voice mails of victims of 9/11. now, this former cop says he was contacted by "news of the world" journalists who said they would pay him to retrieve these phone records right the way through and to 9/11, calls to the relatives, to give them the ability to see exactly who the victims were talking to up until 9/11. this former new york city cop is now a private investigator and he is saying, according to "the daily mirror" report, t
titan rupert murdoch. it was a big day for sales this morning as they said thanks and good-bye. >> yeah. there was a lot of interest. of course, some organizations are actually calling for a boycott today to show their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking.
dad did, my grandfather did and it's what we do today. from the embattled press baron rupert murdoch to the polo playing prince william and his bride stories with the british connection have been very much in the news this past week. ben tracy will have more on the royal tour of california. but first elizabeth palmer in london with the latest on the end of the world, at least for the world's newspaper, that is. >> reporter: the last edition of the news of the world was a proud farewell that recalled 168 years of sunday scoops. rupert murdoch bought the paper in 1969 and used its profits to build his vast media empire that now includes fox news, the wall street journal, and the new york post. but this week this scrappy tabloid was engulfed by scandal. though it remained one of the best-selling newspapers in the english speaking world its name is disgraced and the fallout has damaged politicians, the police and the formidable mr. murdoch. the scandal exploded with a teenager murdered in 2002. on monday in london, a private investigator working for the news of the world was accused of h
will join us live with more. >>> now, to the latest on the phone hacking rocking rupert murdoch's media empire. rebekah brooks arrested over the weekend. and has scotland yard resigning over the failures in the investigation. jeffrey kofman joins us this morning from london. good morning. >> reporter: good morning to you. it's incredible. this scandal unfolding with lightning speed. rupert murdoch's number two arrested. it's fair to say, the air around murdoch himself is getting awfully thin. will where will all of this stop? rupert murdoch has often said he looked on rebekah brooks as his daughter. just a week ago, he indicated that saving her was as important to saving his global empire. but this crisis well beyond his control. brooks, former editor of his now-closed "news of the world," became so toxic, on sunday, she resigned. on sunday she was arrested and questioned about alleged criminal activity while she was at the helm. >> it's very unusual for somebody to be arresteteby appointment on sunday. there could be operational reasons for that. maybe they're going to arrest somebody
tactics brought an end to one of rupert murdoch's most-read papers. it's friday, july 8th. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good friday morning. i'm peggy bunker. >> i'm daniel sieberg in for rob nelson. it was probably no easy decision for rupert murdoch to shut down "the news of the world" after this widespread hacking scandal. so his son broke the news. as the british government launches an investigation, you could call it the end of "the world," this paper had a storied legacy early on. it wasn't quite such a tabloid publication and it did win awards recently. boy, it's turned the corner into more scandalous, controversial stuff. >> definitely gone tabloid. which you know, some papers really have in order to stay alive. that doesn't mean their practices are legit. >> it was a big-selling paper. >> there you go. >>> also coming up, what will happen to casey anthony when she's let out of jail in nine days? how many questions now about her future. also hererase after this acquittal. many people wondering what will happen next. and kind of horrifying enough, many people a
of the tabloid newspaper's former editors has now been arrested a day after rupert murdoch announced he's shutting down the 168-year-old paper. nbc's mike taibbi has more. mike? >> reporter: the so-called phone hacking scandal has been around for years. six years, to be precise. but in the past week it went from a story about celebrity cell phones being hacked to regular people as alleged victims, including the grieving relatives of crime victims or soldiers killed in action and the explosion that's followed led to the extinction of the biggest circulation newspaper in the english speaking world. media barron rupert murdoch has had little to say as the scandal jumped to another level. >> i'm not making any comments. >> reporter: but son james murdoch said if the allegations are true, the newspaper's behavior was inhuman. >> i feel regret. clearly the practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in. >> reporter: one practice that met no standards, that grieving rel tis of murdered children, or of british soldiers killed in ac
the police and people at the newspaper, rupert murdoch's newspaper, and number 10 downing street. the prime minister, david cameron, hired a former news of the world editor andy colton. that story still rumbling along in britain with more sort of suggestions that cameron is under pressure today. he is out country. this story not going away. >> dan rivers, we will keep checking with you. seems there are developments in this story every few hours. >> thanks, dan. >>> there has been a major shake-up in the egyptian government. it is not clear whether it is enough to quiet opposition protesters. egypt's prime minister appointing 14 new cabinet ministers to his cabinet while keeping 13 others in place. they will be sworn into office today. former egyptian president hosni mubarak reportedly slipped into a coma yesterday. the hospital's spokesman tells cnn he has since regained consciousness. >>> hours ago general david petraeus performed his last act as commander of nato forces in afghanistan. he handed off authority to the new komd ander john allen. petraeus is retiring from the army at the end
told to be cool. >>> there's huge breaking news in england where rupert murdoch's 168-year-old "news of the world" rolled off the presses for the last time. his empire is in jeopardy over a phone hacking scandal. murdock has now spoken publicly for the first time. we'll tell you what he's saying. and big sports news derek jeter getting hit number 3,000 with a home run. what did the guy who caught the ball do with it? we'll tell you about that, coming up. >>> we begin with the make or break meeting at the white house today and the crucial debt negotiations that seem to have hit a serious road block overnight. abc's david kerley following the developments through the night. he is live in washington this morning. i guess it all comes down to the issue of taxes. >> reporter: it does. it is all about taxes. and this is a stunning move by the house speaker. on the eve of some of the biggest policy talks in decades, he basically says, i can't do it. overnight, house speaker john boehner threw a buckck of cold water on the talks, saying that because, quote, the white house will not pursue a
as scotland yard alleges, murdoch's company may have broken u.s. law. >> news corp is an american corporation and they are bound by american laws regardless of where the offense takes place. >> reporter: u.s. politicians are also latching on to an unconfirmed report from an unnamed source that "news of the world" hacked phones belonging to 9/11 victims. >> anyone who did this really forget the legality, just in terms of the morality of this is just beyond the pale. >> reporter: the 9/11 allegation appeared on sunday in light of congressional concerns, we called news international, the subsidiary and they told us they have seen no evidence that those allegations are true. >> stephanie gosk in london this morning. thanks as always. martin bashir, it's good to have you here. sometimes when i have you, i like to ask the simplest question first because i like your take. you spend a lot of time as a journalist in the u.k. and here in the united states. >> i worked for the sunday times between 1984 and 1985. >> as you've watched this story unfold over the last month or so, what jumps out at you? >>
everyone. >>> rupert murdoch is in damage control mode over the growing phone hacking scandal at one of his british newspapers. murdoch arrives in london today. reporters for the 168-year-old "news of the world" are accused of hacking cell phones of crime victim, celebrities and politicians. three people have been arrested and the weekly tabloid is ceasing publication tomorrow. >>> the obama administration is sending a strong signal to anti-government protesters in searia. the u.s. ambassador to syria met demonstrators on the streets of the besieged city friday. hundreds of thousands greeted him with roses and olive branches. >>> citizens of the world's newest nation were literally dancing in the streets. south sudan is celebrating its independence from sudan after decades of civil war. south sudan is expected next week to become the 193rd country recognized by the united nations. >>> astronauts aboard "atlantis" will spend most of their first full day looking for damage. the liftoff of the shuttle went off almost without a hitch. a crowd of almost a million turned out to watch that launch.
turning against him. >> reporter: murdoch shut down the "news of the world" because of what was described as toxic culture. but the company is fighting back against allegations involving two of the other papers, "the sun" and "the sunday times." they wanted to get a 2006 article about his child's cystic fi breaux says, suggesting their methods may have been illegal. a new statement from new international denies any wrong doing and said the story "the sun" ran about their son originated from a member of public whose family has also experienced cystic fibrosis. but damage to the company may have already been done. some say it is about time. including actor hugh grant who in recent months has led his own campaign against the tabloid. even recording this conversation with the deputy editor of "news of the world" last april. mcmullen did not know he was being recorded acknowledged hacking was wide spread. >> but celebrities themselves, you would justify because they're rich? >> yeah, mean, if you don't like it you've just got get off the stage. >> reporter: they call it a publicity stunt. not
in this tough economy. >>> damage control, rupert murdoch, the observer of the "wall street journal" and fox news travels to london today to take control of the hacking scandal surrounding his london tabloid that is sending shock waves through the british government. we'll talk to the lawyer of a family of this little girl who touched off this growing firestorm. >>> and royal invasion. after conquering canada, prince william and his wife catherine hit l.a., where they could outshine some of hollywood's brightest stars. "early" this saturday morning, july 9th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a picture perfect day in the big city. i'm russ mitchell. >> i'm rebecca jarvis. from the jobs to the royals and the shuttle launch and to betty ford. >> a courageous first lady who battled addiction to pain killers and addiction to alcohol and defeating breast cancer. she died in palm springs, california, she was 93 years old. scott pelley takes a look back at her remarkable life. >> reporter: relatively unknown until her husband became president, betty ford became one of the most popular a
with the latest. >> rupert murdoch bought "news of the world" but it has been loved by readers and feared by the politicians, celebrities and royals that it has regularly exposed. in its final edition editors asked the reading public not to judge the paper by this scandal but instead by its years in print. with the ink barely dry on the final edition of "the news of the world" rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to manage the damage control personally. on display his so far unqualified support from rebecca brooks, former editor of the paper and now a trusted executive at news corp. smiles for the cameras but calls for hooks to resign are growing louder. one of the most damaging allegations the paper faces is a phone hacking of a 13-year-old murder victim. charismatic redhead was editor of "news of the world "account at the time. >> if she goes that puts a spotlight on rupert murdoch's son james and if he is vulnerable rupert murdoch is himself. >> reporter: he is widely seen as his father's heir apparent. >> james murdoch and rebecca brooks cannot deny responsibility. >> reporter: brook cli
owned by rupert murdoch comes to an end after a scandal. that report is next. >>> and we're going to take you live to l.a. for the latest on the british royal couple's visit to the u.s. >>> according to the u.s. census, more than 120 million americans are self-employed, some become business owners before graduating high school. steve perry introduces us to a couple in tonight's perry's principles. >> reporter: mia is not your typical 18-year-old, she's met the president, rang the bell at the new york stock exchange and started a business. >> you started a vegan cookie business in high school? >> yes, yes. the summer after tenth grade. my parents became vegan when my mom contracted breast cancer 11 years ago. >> what did you know about business? >> just what i learned in the month of nefty. it inspires students to stay in school, by tapping into their interest to create businesses. her bakery won the $10,000 grand prize. businessman turned teacher founded nefty in 1987. he was inspired after he was mugged by some kids in new york city. >> if you can start teaching young people abou
to damage more of the media empire, rupert murdoch will fly into the uk. his own son, james murdock, could face prosecution. yesterday, two top employees were arrested, an editor who once served as the prime minister's communication director and a reporter who served prison time in 2007 when victims included celebrities and members of the royal family. the claim, that people's privacy was invaded. their cell phone voice mails listened to, described as phone hacking. britain's prime minister vowing, no stone will be left unturned. >> that these people could have had their phones hacked into in order to generate stories for a newspaper is simply disgusting. >> among the 4,000 potential phone hacking victims whose names or numbers have now been turned over to the police, families tony phillipson just found out that his son, james, who died in afghanistan in 2006 may have had not only his cell phone tapped into by the news of the world, but also his e-mail. >> they hacked into a dead soldier. this is despicable. what else can you say? what on earth do they think they're going to find. >> in th
. >> the prosecution of the paper and the top executives. rupert murdoch is calling the allegations deplorabldeplorable unacceptable, and it will again cooperate with the police. the reporter who served time released a statement saying there was relentless pressure, a aa constant demand for results. for an outraged british public, there is simply no excuse. >> interestingly enough, in america, we don't have this kind of journalism yet. hopefully the american taste level is still such that it agrees this is just a bridge too far. it's that check and balance on everything else, then the very fabric of our democracy could be put at risk. >> several big advertisers are pulling out of the newspaper. along come more allegations that the paper may have paid police for information. ann? >> pretty shocking allegations. michelle, thank you so much. >>> coming up next, will and catherine wrapping up their canadian tour as they prepare to head to california. l er ts. every day you live with the pain of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis could be another day you're living with joint damage. help stop the damag
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)